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Search Results 0 to 34 of about 35 (some duplicates have been removed)
] and in russia. 7% of the world's energy is here. -- 70% of the world's energy is here. briefly on human-rights, i do believe actually the great difference between democracy and dictatorship is simply this -- a soft assets, but an important one. and it does not have human- rights that i necessarily proud of, but india does have accountability. china can only become a modern nation if it permits democracy and if it permits secularism, that is equality and presence of trade. until then, it can be successful, but not monitored. >> i want to say three things quickly. i want to follow up on the admirals' comments. it is remarkable to many in the u.s. military that the u.s. is not ratified the convention. we had it pretty sincere effort to bring afford to the senate. we worked a couple of the votes short. i think senator mikulski for her support. i hope we will be allowed to take that up again and get that done as a country. it is challenging to make the case we're making, which is that these potential conflicts over territory should be resolved on the basis of principles when the final conven
, china, france, germany, russia, known as the p5+1, and the united kingdom have tried to negotiate with iran over its nuclear program. of sides have fumbled the opportunities to reduce the risks of nuclear-armed iran, and to prevent the risk of war, to reduce the risk of war over that nuclear program. since 2007, the u.s. and western intelligence agencies have assessed that iran is nuclear capable, meaning that iran has a scientific, technical and industrial capacity to eventually produce nuclear weapons if it decides to do so. and those intelligence agencies continue to this day to assess that iran has not yet made a decision to do so. intelligence agencies and independent experts also believe that starting from today iran will require several months to acquire enough this'll material for just one bomb and still more time to build a deliverable nuclear weapon. secretary of defense and a estimate it would take two to three years to do so. in the latest international atomic energy agency report, based on its ongoing inspections iran's nuclear facility, particularly the fordo enrichm
. it scares me sometimes. >> last time we spoke you said you were investing in russia. you still are? >> i'm looking for investments in russia. i don't have anything there yet. it's not that easy for me to find things in russia. partly because i'm a little lazedy these days. i don't work as hard as i used to. >> oh. okay. >> all right. so -- >> maybe -- >> let's put politics aside. what are you doing? tell me about your portfolio. let's get right down to it. what do you like, what are you long, what are you short? >> i'm, today, tomorrow -- today here, tomorrow there -- i'm going to short more bonds, more u.s. government bonds. i'm going to buy more commodities, buy metals, base metals and precious metals. looks to me like the money printing is going to run amok now. and the spending is going to run amok now. again, larry, i'm not saying this is good for the world, it's not good for anybody. this is what's going to go on. i have to invest based on what's happening, not on what i would like. >> mr. rodgers, rick santelli here. what about europe? i don't disagree with your notion you want to
romney goes to russia, secretly sends message to putin to ignore his dad's campaign rhetoric. dad's a douche. >> he's a douche. >> stephanie: not evil. this week, mitt romney's son traveled -- reports say allayed any concerns the russian government had about his father's harsh stance on russia. he said rusch sha our number one -- russia, our number one geopolitical foe. >> we have known that for some time. >> matt has business in russia from what i understand. >> stephanie: while in moscow, he told a russian -- to pute than despite campaign rhetoric, his father wants good relations if he becomes president. [ buzzer ] >> stephanie: my dad's a liar. everyone in america knows it. >> my dad's a jerk! can't even have good relations with england. let alone russia. >> stephanie: all right. joyce in shreveport, louisiana. hi joyce. >> caller: hello. >> stephanie: hi. >> caller: i'm calling because i'm an elected official in shreveport and i have at least 30,000 voters in my district. i want to know why the media is s
nude de in public transportation. what is this, stalinist russia? the crusaders howled and stripped nude, of course. but the new law says are they telling people they should be ashamed of living in the city, and is that wrong? >> they are basically telling people they should be ashamed to be naked in our city. that's totally wrong. >> they couldn't find somebody who didn't have white powder all over? >> speaking of being agitated -- >> very nice. >> wedding rings have a similar affect. >> has the dream come to a tragic end? >> i think so. although i am for the band. if it is legal what is the fun in taking it out on the train? >> you don't mean getting angry. >> i mean throwing my arms up and going huh? >> and then hearing the laughter and sobbing? >> i keep my arms like that until everybody leaves. >> andrew, the new law has exemptions for people at fairs, parades and the beta breakers street run. so they are going to have their fair share of nudity. >> this is part of a vast left wing conspiracy. first we have feminists talking about vaginas. remember when gays were wicked and sor
itself swimming in controversy over a proposed plan to import 18 more of them from russia. >> we feel like our role is not only to have animals so that people can be inspired by seeing them, but we also have to have them to learn from them. >> reporter: the whales all captured in the last seven years would be spread out over six aquariums in the u.s. the first such import in almost two decades. >> we want to ensure that that population is robust and can be maintained. and these belugas can be around for future generations to enjoy. >> this is about money. this is about ticket sales. >> reporter: dr. laurie marino, a neuroscientist at emory university, is among the thousands of people who criticize the plan during an online comment period. she also points out that a newborn beluga whale died at the georgia aquarium earlier this year. >> their lives are ruined in captivity. they will be in socially deprived situations. where their autonomy is taken away. >> reporter: the plan has drawn the attention of peta, and actress kim bassinger, who in a letter last month to the governor called th
down with so many representatives of the united nations of russia, so many representatives of international community yet it did not happen. it first of all has to happen inside the iranian leadership. they have to say on these conditions we have to come and negotiate. they have not done so. melissa: in an effort to save their hard currency at the same time, maybe this is evidence the sanctions are working, they banned import of 75 different goods and called them luxury goods. they include toilet paper. what does it tell you?. >> there is always the black market on the side. they will go after these measures. try to implement them. on the other hand iranian will use black market and the regime knows that. the sanctions we're putting are good but unfortunately they're only targeting the civil society. that is why you see demonstrations from time to time. in iran you have the two economies, the country's economy and the regime's economy. we need to tighten sanction on the regime's economy. melissa: what is the we keep hearing now with the left solution of technology here in t
putin of russia, and the president of spain. with that i'll take your questions. >> a couple questions about the scandal that many of us are now covering, one specific and a bigger picture one. general allen we are learning more about skess about him and the pentagon investigation and alleged behavior does the president have faith that general allen can continue to lead the war in afghanistan. he's under investigation by the pentagon. >> can i tell you that the president thinks very highly of general allen and his service to his country. as well as the job he has done in afghanistan. at the request of the secretary of defense, the president has put on hold general allen's notion as supreme allied commander europe, pending the investigation of his conduct by the department of defense i.d. the president remains focused on fully supporting our extraordinary troops and coalition partners in afghanistan who general allen continues to lead as he has done so ably for over a year. meanwhile, the president has nominated general dunford to be the next commander and reiterates his belief that the
, look, we have the leaders of france and britain and china and russia and the u.n. and we're trying to prevent nuclear weapons, you know, you should probably not meddle in this. that's a winnable argument. i think particularly coming out of this -- obama out of a strong election. no one like gaddafi. no one liked libya. no one liked the soviets. it's doable. >> to partially answer the same question. the issue for many in congress is whether this negotiation quote-unquote allows iran to continue enriching at the 3.5% level or not. the historical position of the united states going back to the early 2000's has been that there should be a suspension of all enrichment as a confidence-building measure. from what you're saying, jim, we're well past that point and iran has a lot of truth on the ground in terms of additional centrifuges and they want the -- their so-called right under the nonproliferation treaty to be recognized. the question is at what level do they continue. >> i think there's also -- i agree with that. i want to go on here. there is a debate over countries have the right
hd hasn't rolled out in turkey and russia. it's a big hedge for us. >> thank you for being here. >> appreciate it very much. join us tomorrow. "squawk on the street" begins right now. >>> good monday morning. welcome to "squawk on the street." i'm melissa lee with carl quintanilla, david faber and jim cramer. we kick off the week better than we had seen last week. looking at a higher open across the board after the worse weekly losses with both indices closing below the 200-day moving average on friday. looking at the action over in europe, we are seeing small gains across the board. our road map starts on capitol hill where congress returns to work tomorrow as leaders prepare to meet with the president this week on the fiscal cliff. lawmakers over the weekend sound optimistic that a deal will be reached. how likely is that? >> jeffries gets bought in a $3.7 billion deal. leucadia is described as a mini berkshire hathaway. >> a war to see who will open earliest on black friday or on thanksgiving itself as it turns out. >> first up, after coming off the worst week for the markets
, benjamin netanyahu congratulating barack obama on his re-election. president putin in russia saying the same thing. one thing i can tell you, the taliban, telling barack obama it's team to get out of afghanistan. so, a stern message from them. >> all right, abc's mark greenblat reporting from capitol hill, live this morning, we thank you, mark. we will extend to you or olive branch as well. >> thank you. >> good to see this kind of tone though on capitol hill. especially kidding just, how divisive it has been. it's good for america to see this. john boehner coming out today. harry reid as well. boehner said, we can't keep setting the bar that low. it is time we raise the bar. i loved what he said about we are ready to be led not as democrats or republicans, but as americans, not as a liberal or conservative, but as the president of the united states. >> that's the quote mark alluded to. you hope in light -- dual messages last night. the country overwhelmingly elected barack obama back to office. more democrats in the senate and the house. on the other side. popular vote very close.
and in russia, and a whole new set of political and social institutions. and my concluding argument is, we really need to be thinking about a social and political adjustment comparable to the one that we -- >> so who puts that in place? the government you say that's bought by the rich? the problem is that how do you solve that? the rich always get control of the government. right? that's why government needs to be as small as possible. the bigger it gets, the more it gets bought. that's the problem. >> actually, i strongly disagree with that. that's a real -- >> that's the premise of your book. >> no, no. that's a counsel of despair to say the government is always going to be controlled and captured by the rich. i think the government can actually be controlled by democratic majorities. think that council of despair is one reason why american society overall is not stepping up to the challenge of our economic times. >> let me bring in robert frank, our wealth editor, for a question. thought? comment? >> thanks. congratulations on the book. >> thank you. >> just a quick question. the discus
arabia and russia to become the world's largest oil producer by the year 2017 thanks to the shale oil revolution and the u.s. could become energy independent. but some analysts warn the u.s. oil boom is still in its infancy and continued growth at levels predicted might not be able to be guaranteed. phil flynn, seen i don't remember market analyst at price futures group. could this be energy independence in your foot, phil? >> yes it can. yes it can. all those people said we couldn't grow our way to energy independence, they're wrong. the people in the industry are very excited about that. you know why this is good, not only for the obvious geopolitical national security things but also because our economy needs something right now. it need as boost. it needs a driving force. energy and energy production probably will be that boost. it will be the new internet revolution, the new thing that could drive the economy for the next 10 to 20 years if not longer. rick: phil, i thought this administration was anti-drilling stood in the way of these kinds of advances. shot down the keystone oi
, potentially -- occasionally, and then russia. [laughter] and 70% of the world's energy is here. energy becomes so dray dramaticy contagious. what do you do? briefly over human rights. i do believe between democracy and dictatorship is this, a soft asset, but a very important one that why india does not record in human rights that, you know, necessarily be proud of, but they have accountability, and, therefore, i believe that whereas china could be a successful nation, it cannot be a modern nation, and it's only a modern nation if it permits democracy and if it permits secularism, the equality and presence of it. until then, it's successful, but not modern. >> james? >> three things very quickly. first, i want to just follow directly on the admiral's comments about the u.n. convention on the law of the sea. it is remarkable to many of the u.s. military that united states is not ratified the convention. we had a pretty sincere effort to bring it forward to the senate. we were a couple of votes short. i think senator my -- mikulski for the support. i think we can take that up again and get it don
to end up like russia. there are thousands of family in cincinnati that have led from socialism. if we have obama as president socialism will be in the united states. host: less of a map to get a sense of where the candidates have been. -- let's look at a map to get a sense of where the candidates have been. all the candidates have been crisscrossing ohio. the other battleground states colorado, iowa, and now wisconsin. minnesota is in play. a romney in pennsylvania. the states of getting the most attention since the party conventions. they have been traveling to a total of 10 states. later this afternoon we will have live coverage of bombing donald. he will be joined by two of the romney sons. they are in virginia. good afternoon. caller: hello. i voted for obama because i am highly impressed with his leadership and the leadership he has shown throughout his administration. i am also impressed with his vice-president mr. joe biden. they work together as a team. we need to finish what we started. i also enjoyed listening to mr. biden's comment today about mitt romney. he said mitt romn
in power and maintain control over at least part of syria and that of course is russia and iran and the result would be al-assad steven pour and the victory which is not going to be good for our simultaneous efforts to try to move iran to the negotiating table to seize the nuclear weapons, and in white portions of syria, a no-man's land rather like the fata of somalia where the militants perhaps probably associated with al qaeda would find a new home. we already see some of this. this is another reason why the administration needs to engage in putting in beijing through military means if necessary the merkley or indirectly through providing weapons and things like no-fly zones. we need to do more and we need to do more urgently or this is great to slip out of control. at best -- and it isn't very good at sifry at salles -- at worst we are going to see any emerging sunni shia fisher across the middle east would be followed by violence and fighting in iraq and elsewhere. let me touch on iraq. it hasn't received too much commentary either in the debates in the campaign or even some
blamed missteps in countries such as brazil and russia for the miss. it assured the issues should be resolved by the end of the year. u.s. grocery chain whole foods has posted third quarter profits in line with forecasts. total sales jumped 24% in the period as consumers continue to switch towards organic produce. however the company did warn investors sales have been hit by the impact of hurricane sandy which left many of their customers without power. and that sent shares lower in after hours trade as you can see there, shedding about nearly 3%. we'll keep an eye on that. and just when new york city thought it was all over, a nor'easter called athena has smacked the tri-state area overnight dumping inches of snow over some of hurricane sandy's hardest hit areas. wind and heavy snow have brought down you power lines and electrical wires and thousands who lost power because of sandy just lost it all over again. now, caroline roth joins us from zurich because over in zurich, swiss re has reported results that have cheered the market. 1.6% at the moment. >> absolutely. earlier on in
this week at a zoo in russia. unfortunately, their birth mother abandoned them, so this shepherd dog stepped in to nurse the little cubs. it's not been the first time the tiger mom refused to feed her babies. it happened five months ago when she gave birth to two cubs. the zoo staff was prepared this time, brought in the dog to help, and the little cubs, well, they are happy campers. arthel: i mean, as if pictures weren't enough, the vocals just kill me. i love it so much. very nice. jon: yeah, that's mom. mom doesn't look too happy, but the cubs are happy. arthel: tsa why we love dogs -- that's why we love dogs. thanks for having me. jon: it's been fun having you here today. i guess now we have to go shopping, right? arthel: yes, we do, and what are we eating? grass-fed beef. jon: see you later on the fox report, 7 p.m. eastern tonight. thank you for joining us. arthel: "america live" starts right now. rick: and we begin with a fox
the bomb on russia, which is a huge problem. so peter sellers in this movie playing numerous roles as he always does, he has to kind of coral all of these people in the government and try to stop this, the crazy war that's going to happen just randomly on one day. and this movie just keeps getting better with age because, you know, lines never stop being funny, as our world gets more and more ridiculous in real life. like george c. scott and the russian ambassador are fighting and peter sellers has to break it up by saying, you can't fight in here. this is the war room. >> i love it. >> and it's a classic. 1964. you are reaching back. not to confuse it with "dr. no." you start thinking about james bond movies, especially since we have been engamed in so much bond stuff with the release of the double-box set, but "dr. strangelove" a classic, a stand out in and of itself and your number one. >> yes, and thanks to my dad who showed this to me as a young age and taught me not to fight in the war room and show people the big boards. important lessons. >> thanks so much. always good to see you
that russia was our number one geopolitical enemy? it's all water under the bridge now. i do wonder, though, did any defining moment really change your mind or was your mind made up on day one? talk back today. election 2012, what was your defining moment? facebook.com/carolcnn. your responses later this hour. >>> a presidential election too close to call, a battleground state mired in voting problems and controversy. sound familiar? sure does in florida. those haunting memories of of that 2000 debacle are still painfully fresh and now a new crop of concerns are hanging over the elections there. ali velshi is keeping a close eye on the problems. he joins us from cnn's vote watch desk. it was ugly this weekend in florida. >> can you imagine that we're having this conversation about voting problems in florida? i guess it wouldn't be a batt battle -- without a battle in florida. one of third of the state's registered democrats do their voting in three counties. this is what the early voting lines looked like in miami yesterday. >> i've been waiting here since 12:30 to pick up an absentee ballo
sensors. russia shaeast navy commander said on june 1st, russian nuclear powered subs would return to the patrolling the world's oceans as they did iner earlier times. he downplayed the it off the east coast saying it was not seen as provocative, jenna. jenna: they were taking a tour, getting close to the coast? what were they doing? >> seems like they're probing and testing response times and testing to see if that sonar really detects them. in this case it did. jenna: in this case it did. a story we'll keep an eye on. that's for sure. jennifer, thank you. jon: good thing. president obama and house speaker john boehner, they are both calling for bipartisanship. they say they want to end the gridlock in washington. any real chance of that? a fair and balanced debate coming up. >>> we have newly-released video of a stolen plane on a wild and destructive ride. who was piloting and how this thing ended, coming up. are you receiving a payout from a legal settlement or annuity over 10 or even 20 years? call imperial structured settlements. the experts at imperial can convert your long-t
likely mr. see if we can work a deal with iran, and forge a new relationship with china. russia is indicating an interest in working with the u.s. on nuclear non-proliferation, and there is the ongoing volatility in the middle east. all of these as the administration undergoes significant personnel and cabinet changes that come with a second term. we're back with more after the break. stay with us. ♪ >>tax cuts don't create jobs. the golden years as the conservatives call them, we had the highest tax rates, and the highest amount of growth, and the highest amount of jobs. those are facts. >>"if you ever raise taxes on the rich, you're going to destroy our economy." not true! what we need are people prepared for the careers of our new economy. by 2025 we could have 20 million jobs without enough college graduates to fill them. that's why at devry university we're teaming up with companies like cisco to help make sure everyone is ready with the know-how we need for a new tomorrow. [ male announcer ] make sure america's ready. make sure you're ready. at devry.edu
! wow. i've he never seen anything other than in soviet russia to see this kind -- >> jim, jim -- >> what? david? >> is it too early to buy groupon? >> i've been debating that, and zynga. >> what is amazing, it wasn't that long ago, this company came public, marketed as a great growth stock. as melissa just said, there is no growth anywhere. it takes you back to a number of the ipos we know quite well, zynga, groupon, facebook to an extent, linkedin, this group never should have been public. before it went public they did that final round, raised $900 million and google was willing to pay them $6 billion for that company but they wouldn't pay it now. >> wow, wow. >> unbelievable. josh brown, frequent guest on "the halftime" today said they have destroyed 10 billion of a $12 billion original cap. this ipo was a war crime. >> a war crime? >> invokes nuremberg. >> have you mentioned, evercore going to $2 price target -- >> he starts by saying we missed our revenue expectations by meeting our operating profitability? wow. meeting what? meeting what? fiscal cliff. >> here on "squawk
and some others too. >> yeah, i was thinking it bick, not brick. russia has been left out of the equation, foreign corrupt investigation, not a great number here at all. the stock had become a very big institutional favorite. if you recall during the mexican investigation, when "new york times" piece it, the stock was trading between 57 and 58. they were then overridden by a couple of really good, solid quarters. this was not the quarter that anyone was looking for. >> except for those who sold the stock over the last couple of weeks. i mean that stock has started to come through. >> i'm kind of confused why this one is so shocking, if only because they had -- they haven't seen even robust the last couple of months. becky did a fabulous job, because you're talking about a 10th of the country involved. the age of walmart is the able of shopping. so what does this say? >> of course when we consider walmart as a percent of overall public retail sales. the numbers are enormous. this retailer dwarf's others by certain metrics. we think the holiday season is going to be competitive, we think we
. >> so like an exchange in the old communitiest russia? sort of like that, exactly. exactly. what i think will happen is there will be a secondary market where people will go for goods and services. the merck, board of trade, i.c.e., there's a lot of technology behind it. it's not just the price on the board. there's clearing in settlement, delivery, all the things that go with back office processing that people forget about. that's ongoing fixed costs that's very expensive. i think the -- cme, one of the top technological companies in the united states. it seems like a massive undertaking, so legislations pass, but none of the detail is worked out. you know, when it comes to the fiscal cliff. many have said you can take an envelope, and we need to extend the age, maybe tax issues, these are easy. but what we're talking about to set up would be on the back of the sears tower. it's monstrous. the government isn't good at this. >> the government isn't good at it. but we know the way we were doing it was bad, right? >> absolutely agreed. >> they're focusing there on costs. that's why costs c
, the british empire, the u.s. and russia, and how these three played geopolitically behind the scenes. >> when i saw the title of this, it makes me think of howard. i know you have done a lot of research. how important, a geeky history question, but how important was that back to forming the guts of what you have done? it's probably the most pom lar and influential a.m. tern tiff history of the united states ever written. >> it's a different kind of book than howard's book. we are both friends with howard and he was very excite d about this project. we miss him and we're building on him but in a different way. howard was talking about social forceses have shaped america. he's talk iing about domestic issues more. what we're talking about is, first of all, the american empire and, secondly, the rise of the national security state. so in some ways howard's book and our book are perfect complements, the two sides that tell the entire story together. >> i'm wondering if, you know, one of the points of this is to say u.s. presidents especially in wartime have trampled on the constitution and intern
with disabilities act was adopted, we had people from many countries come here. i can think of both first russia, then it was greece, ireland, great britain, a number of other countries came here to learn what we had done and then to pick it up and move forward in their own countries. our legal framework influenced the substance of the convention and is informing its implementation in the 125 countries, i think, that has signed the -- that has ratified it along with the european union. my staff was involved in 2002 when the u.n. first broached this subject of coming up with a convention, and in turn provided to them the substance of the americans with disabilities act, its history, its provisions and what had been done from its adoption in 1990 until 2002, and the changes that it had brought about in our own country. so really, the americans with disabilities act really informed and laid the basis for what the u.n. began to do in 2002 and completed in 2006. so again, i'm very grateful to the leadership of senator kerry, senator mccain, also senator dole who i know is -- is not able to be with us
Search Results 0 to 34 of about 35 (some duplicates have been removed)